Chancellor Hereford Cathedral

This job has now expired
Hereford
Office Holder

We seek a residentiary canon who is a storyteller, teacher, and theologian with missional instinct to help interpret the scriptures, the cathedral, and its treasures in the light of the cathedral’s missional purposes to congregations, visitors, volunteers, and staff.

As well as playing a full part in the worshipping life of the cathedral and pastoral care of the community you will have oversight of the Education team, and of Library and Archives staff who manage our theological lending library and take care of our historic artefacts, including the world-famous Mappa Mundi.

The principal duties and responsibilities of this post are as follows:

  • To play a key role in the delivery of liturgy and preaching, including the keeping of statutory periods of residence as agreed annually among the Canons Residentiary
  • To share significantly in the governance of the whole Cathedral and contribute to the development of the Cathedral’s ministry
  • To manage and participate in the provision of study programmes for the congregation, the Cathedral community, and the wider community, and to encourage others in their discipleship
  • To deliver, through the Head of Schools and Family Learning, the Cathedral’s schools and education service
  • To ensure, through the Library and Archives Team, the care, conservation, and display of the Mappa Mundi, the Chained Library, the 1217 Magna Carta and other artefacts in the Cathedral’s archives
  • Managing, through the Librarian, the Cathedral’s lending library and reading room, which are open to the public
  • To find ways of interpreting the Cathedral’s treasures historically and missionally
  • To work with the Visitor Engagement Officer to find ways of connecting visitors to the Cathedral with the Christian story
  • To be the link with Hereford City Deanery Chapter/Synod, and other churches in the city
  • To contribute to the life of the diocese as required and agreed with the Dean.
  • A priest in the Church of England who has been ordained priest for at least 6 years
  • An authentic person of prayer possessed of evident faith
  • A pastor and follower of Christ who will lead by example
  • A storyteller, able to communicate theologically at all levels through words and images
  • A stimulating and intelligent preacher
  • A theologian committed to the work of adult Christian formation and theological education
  • A determined voice in keeping the Missio Dei at the heart of all we do, but with a feeling for heritage issues in relation to the life of the cathedral church.

Hereford Cathedral has a Saxon Foundation and its early life received great impetus from the cult of St Ethelbert, king and martyr (d.794). Later, rebuilt by the Normans, the Cathedral became one of the nine ‘Old Foundation’ Cathedrals, governed by Canons with its worship supported by a College of Vicars Choral. Its fame as a place of pilgrimage was enhanced during the 13th century with the death and canonisation of St Thomas Cantilupe and for a time, the Cathedral even rivalled Canterbury in the number of its pilgrims.

Being so isolated and also being non-monastic, the Cathedral suffered less than most at the Reformation, and partly through these circumstances, its famous library and the Mappa Mundi were spared for future generations.

Never a ‘Lincoln’ or a ‘York’ in size or architectural splendour, Hereford Cathedral, with its rich red sandstone, is ideally ‘matched’ to the surrounding countryside and many visitors remark on the warm welcome and homely atmosphere of the building.

The 18th century brought the foundation of the Three Choirs Festival - now almost 300 years old and the oldest music festival in Europe - a festival which Hereford hosts in turn with its sister cathedrals at Gloucester and Worcester. The calibre of choral music at Hereford is outstanding and nationally regarded, and the choir sings Evensong on most evenings of the school term.

The end of the 20th century saw the building of the new library and Mappa Mundi building which has given new life and impetus to the conservation and presentation of our ancient treasures, and continues the tradition of Christian scholarship.

Visited by about 120,000 people each year, the Cathedral is in constant use by groups and individuals, for many of whom it is an important place of pilgrimage, a focus of prayer and a resource for involvement in the wider community.